Western nations enter a period of economic prosperity and modern technology brings significant cultural changes. The United-States emerges as a major economic and military power.

1918-1919

1920

1921

Greenwood District

The Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma is one of the wealthiest African-American communities in the United-States. It is sometimes known as Black Wall Street.

Dick Rowland

Teenage African-American Dick Rowland is accused of assaulting a younger white girl. Rowland is arrested and a mob of angry white locals call for his lynching in front of the courthouse.

Violent Protest

Rumours spread that Rowland has been lynched. Armed black locals from the Greenwood District protest at the courthouse. Shots are soon fired, resulting in the death of two black and ten white people.

Tulsa Massacre

White residents retaliate and attack the Greenwood District, which includes firebombing from airplanes. The district is destroyed, which results in at least 36 black deaths and 800 injuries. 

The Tulsa Massacre, also known as the Tulsa Race Riot, is considered the single worst incident of racial violence in American history. Many deaths may have been left unrecorded and the numbers could be up to 300.

1922

1923

Klu Klux Klan Apex

The Klu Klux Klan reaches the height of its popularity. It includes up to five million men and accounts for about 15% of the adult population of the United States.

Rosewood Massacre

When a black man is accused of assaulting a white woman in Florida, white residents destroy the nearby black town of Rosewood. Over 27 people are likely killed in the attack.

United States v Bhagat Singh Thind

An Indian Sikh attempts to become a U.S. Citizen as a free white person based on the fact that Indians and Europeans share a common descent. He loses the case in the U.S. Supreme Court.

New York Renaissance

An all-black professional basketball team is established in Harlem. The skilled team soon attempts to beat an all-white professional team known as the Original Celtics.

Many East Indians have their American citizenship revoked or rejected due to the outcome of the United States v Bhagat Singh Thind case. Bhagat Singh Thind became a U.S. citizen in 1935 based on his status as a WWI veteran.

1924

Re-Election of President Coolidge

President Coolidge becomes the first U.S. President to deliver a radio broadcast from the White House. He also wins re-election in the 1924 U.S. Presidential Election.

The Immigration Act

President Coolidge signs the Immigration Act of 1924. It prohibits immigration from Asia and sets the total immigration quota to 164,000 for countries from the Eastern Hemisphere.

Indian Citizenship Act

 President Coolidge signs the Indian Citizenship Act, which grants citizenship to all Native Americans born within the United States. It was in recognition of the many natives that served in the Great War.

Revenue Act of 1924

Coolidge supports a smaller government and reduces federal spending. Congress passes a revenue act which reduces income tax rates and eliminates income tax for about two million residents.

1925

The Most Populous City

New York City becomes the most populated city in the world with over 7.7 million residents. It takes the lead from London, England which had been the most populous city for nearly 100 years.

M.E. Norman Sinking

A steamboat capsizes in the Mississippi River, which kills 23 passengers. However, African American riverworker Tom Lee rescues 32 passengers using his small riverboat.

Harlem Renaissance

Black populations migrate northward to escape southern racism. There is an explosion of African-American culture in the northern United-States, which is centred around Harlem, New York.

The New Negro

African American Philosopher Alain Locke compiles literature from the Harlem Renaissance. He edits them into an anthology book called The New Negro, which becomes the definitive text of the movement.

Before 1910, 90% of the Black population lived in southern states. Around six million African-Americans migrated northward between 1916 and 1970. It is known as the Great Northward Migration.

Grand Dragon Stephenson

D.C. Stephenson was appointed a Grand Dragon of the Klu Klux Klan in Indiana in 1923. He is adept at recruiting new members and develops ties with the state government.

Kidnapping of Madge Oberholtzer

Government employee Madge Oberholtzer is kidnapped, raped, and tortured. She subsequently dies from a combination of her injuries and suicide by self-poisoning. 

Stephenson v. State

D.C. Stephenson, who was in a short relationship with Oberholtzer, is accused of causing her death and brought to trial. He is found guilty of her murder and sentenced to life in prison.  

KKK Decline

When D.C. Stephenson is denied a pardon, he releases the list of government officials that are paid by the clan. The murder and scandal causes a massive decline in KKK membership.

Due to their close association with the KKK, the Anti-Saloon League also lost much support.

1926

1927

1928